❴EPUB❵ ✼ Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art Author Leo Steinberg – Saudionline.co.uk


Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art quotes Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art, litcharts Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art, symbolism Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art, summary shmoop Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art, Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art 47699f61 Leo Steinberg S Classic Other Criteria Comprises Eighteen Essays On Topics Ranging From Contemporary Art And The Plight Of Its Public And The Flatbed Picture Plane To Reflections On Picasso, Rauschenberg, Rodin, De Kooning, Pollock, Guston, And Jasper Johns The Latter, Which Francine Du Plessix Gray Called A Tour De Force Of Critical Method, Is Widely Regarded As The Most Eye Opening Analysis Of The Johns S Work Ever Written This Edition Includes A New Preface And A Handful Of Additional Illustrations The Art Book Of The Year, If Not Of The Decade And Possibly Of The Century The Significance Of This Volume Lies Not So Much In The Quality Of Its Insights Although The Quality Is Very High And The Insights Are Important As In The Richness, Precision, And Elegance Of Its Style A Meeting With The Mind Of Leo Steinberg Is One Of The Most Enlightening Experiences That Contemporary Criticism Affords


10 thoughts on “Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art

  1. says:

    This is a startlingly good book, a book as much of good writing as good criticism Leo Steinberg may not have practiced any of the artistic disciplines he criticizes, but his criticism endures a half century after he wrote it because he practiced criticism as an art.This is a book that asks questions of its subjects, makes demands on them, too, and does so with a confidence that goes It is not important to ask the same question of a work of art that its artist asked it is important what questions a work of art makes you ask as its viewer.There are so very many instances of fine writing in this book that one must quote some at length The artist s dream is to intend something else and still come up with art p 57 At this task Steinberg himself succeeds In the realistic figure drawings now shown at the Modern, the forms, even when coaxed with elaborate shading, remain unachieved Outlines are traced, but with no lateral span, and the paper won t rise in response The indicated solids lack the expanding pressure Somehow the wind has died in the sail, and the sheet is becalmed What was common possession when it was part of a vigorous style seems now beyond reach p 256 And For the capacity to love only the prettiest chorus girl in the line bespeaks a finical emotion, one so narrow and so niggardly, there is in it as much of lacklove as of love It takes a manly heart, like that of Rubens if you like, to stake the bounds of lovability wide, and to love Helen for all her silly, puckered knees p 260 And Like all works connected with discoveries of representation, his pictures lack the sweet ease of accomplishment His pictures are ever aborning, swelling into space and taking life, like frozen fingers tingling as they warm It is not facts they purvey it is the thrill and wonder of cognition p 295 That passage, right there, is what separates an artist from a model or merchant You can, as an artist, try to say something big about life or be content to make the stuff in your hands come to life And this humbler task is the greater, for all else merely follows p 331 If one wishes to consider Picasso s genius for line drawing or make sense of Johns or celebrate alongside another lover of Rodin s sculptures, Leo Steinberg is there for him or her But even if one hasn t any particular interest in any of it, but does love fantastic writing, Other Criteria is well worth the time of its 400 page investment.


  2. says:

    A mixed bag of art history essays Whenever Steinberg writes about art in general he is fascinating His account of how he had to learn to appreciate Jasper Johns, who displayed none of the aesthetic qualitites that Steinberg had learned to look out for and appreciate in art, is superb It is also a great argument against formalism, recognising that some art has the power to shift our perception about what art can be rather than expecting it to fit into a pre existing criteria Apart from anything else his writing shifts some power and authority from the hands of the critics to the hands of the artists He also writes a pretty devestating critique of Clement Greenberg s formalism, whilst acknowledging that Abstract Expressionism needed the advocacy of Greenberg to achieve the level of acclaim and recognition it eventually received When Steinberg writes about a particular artist I found it a bit less interesting and a bit dry I expect these sections to be of greater interest to art historians than the general reader The exception is the essay on Rodin which makes a pretty convincing case for his greatness.


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